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BOOK OF WISDOM OR FOLLY


     

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Title:

The Book of Wisdom or Folly.  Liber Aleph vel CXI.

   

Upper Cover

 

Lower Cover

 

Spine

 

Dust Jacket (Upper)

 

Dust Jacket (Lower)

 

Dust Jacket (Spine)

 

Dust Jacket (Inner - Front)

 

Dust Jacket (Inner - Rear)

 

Title Page

 

Frontispiece

 

Frontispiece Caption

 

Errata Slip

 

Introduction - Part 1

 

Introduction - Part 2

 

Printer

 

Rio de Janeiro

 

Print
Variations
:

Printed on machine-made paper.1

Bound in red textured cloth.7
Spine stamped in gilt vertically down spine ‘LIBER ALEPH vel CXI’.2
Has a dust-jacket designed by Frieda Harris.1
10 5/8” x 7 3/16”.2

 
Publisher:

Thelema Publishing Company.1

 
Printer:

Compositora Grafica LUX Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.3

 
Published At:

West Point, California.1

 
Date:

Ceremonially published 23 September 1961 e.v. 6.19 a.m.  Copyright page states 1962.3

 
Edition:

1st Edition.

 
Pages:

xiv + 220.2

 
Price:

Priced at 7.50.2

 
Remarks:

Has an errata slip facing page xii.1
Has a portrait of Aleister Crowley tipped in as a frontispiece.1 
This is The Equinox Volume III, Number 6.1 
Distributed by Samuel Weiser.2 
Published together by Karl Germer and Marcelo Ramos Motta.4  Motta did all the publishing, editing, printing and binding of this book.5
A typescript bound in half morocco was presented to Karl Germer by Crowley with an inscription which read “To my beloved Brother in the light Karl Johannes Germer Saturni with a depth of affection that is altogether beyond human expression.  Aleister Crowley 666”6

Julius Evola's third volume of Ur published in 1955 included passages from this book (Liber Aleph).8

 
Pagination:2

Page(s)

 

[  i]

Half-title

[  ii]

‘[seal of the A\A\] | Publication in Class B.’

[  iii]

‘In Hastings | (with little left but pipe and wit)’

[  iv]

Copyright 1962 | by Karl J. Germer | Printed Compositora Grafica LUX Ltda., Rio de Janerio, Brazil

[vii-viii]

Introduction by the editors

[ix-xii]

Contents

[  xiii]

Fly-title

[  xiv]

Blank

[1-208]

Text

[209-219]

Index

[220]

‘ESTA CORA FOI EXECTATA NAS OFICINAS DA | COMPOSITORA GRÁFICA LUX LTD., RUA FREI | CANECA, 224 - RIO DE JANERIO’

 
Contents:

1.

 

Apologia (Apology)

2.

 

De Arte Kabbalistica (On the Qabalistic Art)

3.

 

De Vita Corrigenda (On Correcting One’s Life)

4.

 

Legenda de Amore (Fables of Love)

5.

 

Gesta de Amore (Of Love in History)

6.

 

Ultima Thesis de Amore (A Final Thesis on Love)

7.

 

De Natura Sua Percipienda (On Perceiving One’s Own Nature)

8.

 

Altera de Via Naturae (More on the Way of Nature)

9.

 

Quo Modo Natura Sua Est Legenda (How One Should Consider One’s Nature)

10.

 

De Somniis. Causa Per Accidens. ( On Dreams. Accidental)

11.

 

De Somniis. Causa Per Naturam.(On Dreams. Natural)

12.

 

De Somniis. Vestimenta Gorroris. (On Dreams. Clothed with Horror)

13.

 

De Somniis. Sequentia. (On Dreams. Continued)

14.

 

De Somniis. Clavicula. (On Dreams. They Key)

15.

 

De Via Per Empyraeum (On Astral Travel)

16.

 

De Cultu (On THelemic Cult)

17.

 

De Clavicula Somniorum (On the Key of Dreams)

18.

 

De Somno Lucido (On the Sleep of Light)

19.

 

De Venenis (On Poisons)

20.

 

De Motu Vitae (On the Motion of Life)

21.

 

De Morbis Sanguinis (On the Diseases of the Blood)

22.

 

De Cursu Amoris (On the Way of Love)

23.

 

De Nuptiis Mysticis (On the Mystical Marriage)

24.

 

De Voluptate Poenarum (On the Joy of Sorrows)

25.

 

De Voluntate Ultima (On the Ultimate Will)

26.

 

De Differentia Rerum (On the Difference between Things)

27.

 

De Voluntate Tacita (On the Hidden Will)

28.

 

De Formula Summa (On the SUpreme Formula)

29.

 

De Via Inertiae (On the Way of Inertia)

30.

 

De Via Libertatis (On the Way of Freedom)

31.

 

De Lege Motus (On the Law of Motion)

32.

 

De Legibus Contra Motum (On the Laws Against Motion)

33.

 

De Necessitate Communi (On the Common Need)

34.

 

De Libertate Corporis (On the Freedom of the Body)

35.

 

De Libertate Mentis (On the Freedom of the Mind)

36.

 

De Libertate Juvenum (On the Freedom of Children)

37.

 

De Vi Per Disciplinam Colenda (On Cultivating Strength through Discipline)

38.

 

De Ordine Rerum (On the Order of Things)

39.

 

De Fundamentis Civitatis (On the Fundamentals of the State)

40.

 

De Voluntate Juvenum (On the Will of Children)

41.

 

De Modo Disputandi (On How to Teach)

42.

 

De Voluntate Juvenis Cognoscenda (On Learning How to Know the Will of a Child)

43.

 

De Auro Rubeo (On the Red Gold)

44.

 

De Sapientia in re Sexuali (On Wisdom in Sexual Affairs)

45.

 

De Gradibus Aequis Scientiae (On the Right Gain of Knowledge)

46.

 

De Virtute Audendi (On the Virtue of Daring)

47.

 

De Arte Mentis Colendi (On the Training of the Mind) (1) Mathematica (Mathematics)

48.

 

Sequitur (Continued) (2) Classica (Classics)

49.

 

Sequitur (Continued) (3) Scientifica (Science)

50.

 

De Modo Quo Operet Lex Magica (How Magickal Law Works)

51.

 

De Machina Magica (On the Mechanism of Magick)

52.

 

De Harmonis Animae Cum Corpore (On the Harmony of the Soul with the Body)

53.

 

De Mysterio Prudentiae (On the Mystery of Economy)

54.

 

De Arte Alchemica (On the Alchemical Art)

55.

 

De Arcano Subtilissimo (On the Most Subtle Secret)

56.

 

De Menstruo Artis (On the Medium of the Art)

57.

 

De Necessitate Voluntatis (On the Necessity of the Will)

58.

 

De Comedia Universa, Quae Dictur Pan (On the Universal Comedy which is called Pan)

59.

 

De Caecitia Hominum (On the Blindness of Men)

60.

 

Allegoria de Caissa (An Allegory on Chess)

61.

 

De Veritate Falsi (On the Truth of Falsehood)

62.

 

De Relatione Illusionum (On the Relations of Illusion)

63.

 

De Prudentia (On Prudence)

64.

 

De Ratione Magi Vitae (On the Relativity of the Life of the Magician)

65.

 

De Corde Candido (On the Pure Heart)

66.

 

De Conformitate Magi (On the Conformity of the Magician)

67.

 

De Poetis (On the Poets)

68.

 

De Magis Ordinis A\A\ Quibus Caro Fir Verbum (On the Magi of the A\A\ in whom the Word takes Flesh)

69.

 

De Magis Tempori Antiqui:  Imprimis, de Lao-Tze (On the Magi of Old, First, Lao-Tze)

70.

 

De Gautama (On Gautama)

71.

 

De Sri Krishna et de Dionyso (On Sri Krishna and Dionysus)

72.

 

De Tahuti (On Tahuti)

73.

 

De Quodam Mago Aegyptiorum, Quem Appelunt Judaei Mosheh (On that Egyptian Magus whom the Jews called Mosheh)

74.

 

De Mago Arabico Mohammed (On the Arabian Magus Mohammed)

75.

 

De se Ipso ΤΩΙ ΜΕΤΑ ΘΗΡΙΩΙ, ΤΩΙ ΑΟΓΩΙ ΑΙΩΝΟΣ Cujuc Verbum Est Θελημα (On the Great Beast Himself, the Logos of the Aeon, whose word is Thelema)

76.

 

Mandatum ad Filium Suum (A Command to His Son)

77.

 

Quare Filium Creavit:  Ut Fiat Libertas (Wherefore he Begat his Son:  So that there be Freedom)

78.

 

De Sua Debilitate (On His Frailty)

79.

 

De Manu Quae Magum Sustinet (On the Hand that Upholds the Magus)

80.

 

De Suo Peccato (On His Sin)

81.

 

De Sua Victoria Per Nomen Babalon (On His Victory through the Name Babalon)

82.

 

De Arcano Nefando (On the Forbidden Secret)

83.

 

De Arcano, Per Quod Spiritus Quidam in Corpore Recipiatur (On the Secret through which any Spirit is Received in the Body)

84.

 

De Clave Kabbalistica Hujus Artis (On the Qabalistic Key of this Art)

85.

 

De Missa Spiritus Sancti (On the Mass of the Holy Ghost)

86.

 

De Formula Tota (On the Complete Formula)

87.

 

De Hac Formula Considerationes Kabbalisticae (Qabalistic Considerations on this Formula)

88.

 

De Quibusdam Artibus Magicis (On Certain Arts Magick)

89.

 

De Magno Opere (On the Great Work)

90.

 

De Gradibus ad Magnum Opus (On the Steps to the Great Work)

91.

 

De Formula Lunae (On the Formula of the Moon)

92.

 

De Aquilae Sumenda (On the Taking of the Eagle)

93.

 

De Medicinis Secundum Quattuor Elementa (On the Chemical Agents According to the Four Elements)

94.

 

De Virtute Experimentiae in Hoc Arte (On the Virtue of Experience in this Art)

95.

 

De Sacramento Vero (On the True Sacrament)

96.

 

De Discipulis Regendis (On Directing Disciples)

97.

 

De Quibusdam Morbis Discipulorum (On Certain Diseases of Disciples)

98.

 

De Culpis Domi Petendis (On Watching for Faults in the House)

99.

 

De Corpore Umbra Hominis (On the Body, that is the Shadow of Man)

100.

 

De Sirenis (On Sirens)

101.

 

De Femina Quadam (On a Certain Woman)

102.

 

De Sua Virtute (On Her Virtue)

103.

 

De Aliquibus Modis Oraculi Petendi (On Seeking for Certain Types of Oracle)

104.

 

De Fratribus Nigris Filiis Iniquitatis (On the Black Brothers, Sons of Iniquity)

105.

 

De Virtute Chirurgica (On the Virtue of Surgery)

106.

 

De Operibus Microcosmi.  Quorum Sunt Quattuor Minores.  (On the Four Lesser Operations of the Microcosmis Star)

107.

 

De Operibus Stellae Microcosmi.  Quorum Sunt Quattuor Mahores.  (On the Four Major Operations of the Microcosmic Star)

108.

 

De Stella Macrocosmi (On the Macrocosmic Star)

109.

 

De Sua Femina Olun, et de Ecstasia Praeter Omnia (On His WOman Olun and on the Ecstasy that Surpasses All)

110.

 

De Nomine Olun (On the Name Olun)

111.

 

De Viris Magnanimis, Amore Praeclarissimis (On Great Men, Famous in Love)

112.

 

De Castitate (On Chastity)

113.

 

De Ceremonio Equinoxi (On the Ceremony of the Equinox)

114.

 

De Luce Stellarum (On the Light of the Stars)

115.

 

De Cantu (On Song)

116.

 

De Stultitia Humana (On Human Stupidity)

117.

 

De Suo Proelio (On His Struggle)

118.

 

De Necessitate Verbi Clamandi (On the Need for Declaring the Word)

119.

 

De Mysterio Eucharistico Universali (On the Mystery of the Universal Sacrament)

120.

 

De Recto in Recto (On the Rightness of Things)

121.

 

De Virgine Beata (On the Blessed Virgin)

122.

 

De Joca Suae Moechae (On the Sport of His Mistress)

123.

 

De Periculo Jocorum Amoris (On a Danger in the Sports of Love)

124.

 

De Libidine Secreta (On the Unconscious, or Libido)

125.

 

De Ordine Civitatum (On the Organization of Communities)

126.

 

De Scientiae Modo (On the Method of Science)

127.

 

De Monstris (On Monsters)

128.

 

De Inferno Palatio Sapientiae (On the Hidden Place of Wisdom)

129.

 

De Vitiis Voluntatis Secretae (On the Defects of the Hidden Will)

130.

 

De Ratione Praesidio Voluntatis (On Reason, the Minister of the Will)

131.

 

De Cursu Sapientis (On the Way of Wisdom)

132.

 

De Ratione Quae Sine Voluntate est fons Maniae (On Reason, Source of Madness When not under Will)

133.

 

De Veritate Quem Feminae non Dicere Licet (On Truth, which may not be told to a Woman)

134.

 

De Natura Feminae (On the Nature of Woman)

135.

 

De Duobus Praemiis Viae (On the Two Rewards of the Path)

136.

 

De Ecstasia Samadhi, Quo Illis Differit (On the Ecstasy of Damadhi and How it Differs from Others)

137.

 

De Arte Amoris et Deliciarum Mystici (On the Art of Love and the Pleasures of the Mystic)

138.

 

De Praemio Summo, Vera Sapientia et Beatitudine Perfects (On the Highest Reward, True Wisdom and Perfect Happiness)

139.

 

De Inferno Sevorum (On the Hell of the Slaves)

140.

 

Rhapsodia de Domina Nostra (A Rhapsody to Our Lady)

141.

 

Rhapsodia de Astro Suo (A Rhapsody to His Star)

142.

 

De Harmonia Voluntatis Cum Destinia (On the Harmony of Will and Fate)

143.

 

Paranthesis de Quadam Virgine (A Parenthesis on a Certain Virgin)

144.

 

De Constantia Amoris, Corvo Candido (On Constancy in Love, To a White Raven)

145.

 

De Mysterio Mali (On the Mystery of Evil)

146.

 

De Virtute Tolerantia (On the Virtue of Tolerance)

147.

 

De Formula Deorum Morientium (On the Formula of the Dying God)

148.

 

De Stultis Malignis (On Malign Fools)

149.

 

Apologia Pro Suis Literis (An Apology for His Writings)

150.

 

Laus Legis Thelema (In Praise of the Law of THelema)

151.

 

De Sphinge Aegyptiorum (On the Sphinx of the Egyptians)

152.

 

De Natura ΣΦΙΝΨ (Of the Nature of the Sphinx)

153.

 

De Tauro (On the Bull)

154.

 

De Leone (On the Lion)

155.

 

Altera de Leone (Further on the Lion)

156.

 

De Viro (On the Man)

157.

 

De Dracone, Quae est Aquila, Serpens, Scorpion (On the Dragon, which is the Eagle, Serpent and Scorpion)

158.

 

De Quattuor Virtutis ΣΦΙΝΨ (On the four virtues of the Sphinx)

159.

 

De Libra, In Qua Quattuor Virtutes Aequipollent (On the Balance in which the Four Virtues Gather Power)

160.

 

De Pyramide (On the Pyramid)

161.

 

Prolegomena de Silentio (Concerning Silence)

162.

 

De Natura Silentii Nostri (On the Nature of Our Silence)

163.

 

De Formula Recta Draconis (On the Correct Formula of the Dragon)

164.

 

De Sua Carta Coelorum (On His Horoscope)

165.

 

De Opere Suo (On His Work)

166.

 

De Fratribus Nigris (On the Black Brothers)

167.

 

De Arte Alchemistica (On the Alchemical Art)

168.

 

De Femina:  Quae est Propria Joco (On Woman, who is fit for a Jest)

169.

 

De FOrmula Feminae (On the Formula of Woman)

170.

 

Verba Magistri Sui de Femina (His Master’s Words on Woman)

171.

 

De Via Propria Feminis (On the Proper Conduct of Woman)

172.

 

De Hac Re Altera Intelligenda (Further Concerning This)

173.

 

De Clavibus Mortis et Diaboli, Arcanis Tou Tarot Fraternitatis R. C. (On the Keys of Death and the Devil, Arcana of the Tarot of the R. C. Brotherhood)

174.

 

Sequitur de His Viis (urther on these Paths)

175.

 

De Oculo Hoor (On the Eye of Hoor)

176.

 

De Sua Initiatione (On His Initiation)

177.

 

De Herbo Sanctissimo Arabico (On the Most Holy Grass of the Arabs)

178.

 

De Quibusdam Mysteriis, Quae Vidi (On Certain Mysteries I have Seen)

179.

 

De Quorum Modo Meditationes (On a Certain Method of Meditation)

180.

 

Sequitur de Hac Re (Further on This)

181.

 

Dequitur de Hac Re (Further on This)

182.

 

Conclusio de Hac Modo Sanctitatis (Conclusion on this Method of Holiness)

183.

 

De Via Sola Solis (On the Way of the Sun)

184.

 

De Prudentia Ordinis AA (On the Prudence of the AA)

185.

 

Altera de Sua Via (Further on this Path)

186.

 

De Prudentia Artis Docendi (On Prudence in the Art of Teaching)

187.

 

De Mente Inimica Animo (On the Mind, Enemy of the Soul)

188.

 

De Illuminatum Operibus Diversis (On Different Works of the Illuminators)

189.

 

De Eadem Re ALtera Verba (Further Words on This)

190.

 

De Pace Perfects Luce (On the Perfect Peace with Light)

191.

 

De Pace Perfecta (On Perfect Peace)

192.

 

De Morte (On Death)

193.

 

De Adeptis R. C. Escatologia (On the Eschatology of the R. C. Adepts)

194.

 

De Nuptiis Summis (On the Supreme Marriage)

195.

 

De Arte Voluptate Dilemma Quaedam (On a Certain Problem in the Art of Pleasure)

196.

 

De Hoc Modo Dissolutio (On Unraveling of this Knot)

197.

 

De Comedia, Quae IIan Dictur (On the Comedy which is called Pan)

198.

 

De Ludo Amoris (On the Game of Love)

199.

 

De Gaudio Stupri (On the Pleasures of Debauchery)

200.

 

De Caecitia Philosophorum Antiquorum (On the Blindness of the Ancient Philosophers)

201.

 

De Heresia Manichaea (On the Manichean Heresy)

202.

 

De Veritate Rerum (On the Truth of Things)

203.

 

De Aphorismo Ubi Dico:  Omnia Sunt (On My Aphorism:  All Aye)

204.

 

De Ratione Hujus Epistolae Scribendae (On the Reason for Writing this Letter)

205.

 

De Natura Hujus Epistolae (On the Nature of this Letter)

206.

 

De Modo Quo Haec Epistolam Scripsi (How I Wrote this Letter)

207.

 

De Sapientia et Stultitia (Of Wisdom and Folly)

208.

 

De Oraculo Summo (On the Last Oracle)

     

Illustration

-

 

Portrait of Aleister Crowley mounted on page iii as frontispiece.

 

Author’s
Working
Versions:

1.

Manuscript in the hand of Aleister Crowley.  Warburg Institute Collection.

2.

Typescript with corrections in the hand of Aleister Crowley.  Pages:  214.  Warburg Institute Collection.

 

Other
Known
Editions:

+

Level Press, San Francisco, California, (Large hardbound edition), 1972.

+

Level Press, San Francisco, California, (Small edition), 1973.

+

Gordon Press, New York, 1973.

+

Level Press, San Francisco, California, (Small edition), 1974.

+

Unicorn, Seattle, Washington, circa 1974.

+

L.A.Brock, Chico, California, No date.

+

Aeon Press, Seattle, Washington,1985.

+

The Equinox, Volume 3, Number 6; 93 Publishing, Canada,1991.

+

Samuel Weiser, Maine,1991.

 
Bibliographic
Sources:

1.

Gerald Yorke, A Bibliography of the Works of Aleister Crowley (Expanded and Corrected by Clive Harper from Aleister Crowley, the Golden Dawn and Buddhism:  Reminiscences and Writings of Gerald Yorke, Keith Richmond, editor, The Teitan Press, York Beach, ME, 2011, p. 55.

2.

Dianne Frances Rivers, A Bibliographic List with Special Reference To the Collection at the University of Texas,  Master of Arts Thesis, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 1967, pp. 155-156. 

3.

Personal observation of the item.

4. Richard Kaczynski, Ph.D., Perdurabo:  The Life of Aleister Crowley, North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, California, 2010, p. 566.
5. Phyllis Seckler, The Thoth Tarot, Astrology, & Other Selected Writings, The Teitan Press, York Beach, ME, 2010, p. 332.
6. Bill Heidrick, Thelema Lodge Calendar, November 1997, Internet resource last accessed on 27 November 2015.
7. Weiser Antiquarian Books, Catalog # 106, “Aleister Crowley.  Used and Rare Books and Ephemera.”
8. Marco Pasi, Aleister Crowley and the Temptation of Politics, Acumen, Durham, 2014, pp. 141-146.

 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     So much for the profane. For the aspirant I wrote the book called De Lege Libellum, otherwise called The Sandal, in which I analysed the Law as the source of light, life, love and liberty, and pronounced a panegyric upon it in each of these respects successively. For sustained sublimity of prose this book perhaps ranks next to those in which my pen was definitely and authentically inspired. (The criterion of such inspiration, by the way, is that in the case of an inspired book such as Liber VII or Liber LXV I do not dare to “change as much as the style of a letter”. I show, in fact, precisely that reverence for the author which should always be observed by the mere editor, and in this case, having not only the manuscript but my memory to assist me in case of any question arising as to the text in consequence of what my earliest tutor would doubtless have considered imperfections of caligraphy, there is fortunately no reason for anxiety as to the critical perfection of the text.)
     The above remarks may appear strange as a preliminary to the statement that I regarded and still regard this book The Sandal as essentially an exercise in technique undertaken in order to fit myself to write Liber Aleph, The Book of Wisdom or Folly, which is beyond question a consummate masterpiece in its particular sphere in literature. It has always been my custom to practise with a rapier very thoroughly before fighting a duel. If occasionally these friendly bouts have resulted in a few deaths — the more the merrier!
     Liber Aleph, The Book of Wisdom or Folly was intended to express the heart of my doctrine in the most deep and delicate dimensions. (Before using the word dimensions many considerations occurred to me. It is startling; that quality itself is not repugnant to its use in such a connection. Its use was followed by a discussion between myself and my cynocephalus, who was herself struck by the singularity of the word, so much so, that I had to warn her not to spell it with two d’s, and my explanations, thought unsatisfactory, decided me to insert this note in the text of my autohagiography.)
     Liber Aleph is the most tense and intense book that I have ever composed. The thought is so concentrated and, if I may use the word, nervous, that both to write then, and to read now, involved an involves an almost intolerable strain. I remember how I used to sit at my desk night after night — it was the bitterest winter that had been known in New York for many years — but even if the central heating had been the flames of hell itself, I doubt whether I should have been warm. Night after night I sat, all through, rigid as a corpse, and icier; the whole of my life concentrated in two spots; the small section of my brain which was occupied in the work, and my right wrist and fingers. I remember with absolute clearness that my consciousness appeared to start from a perfectly dead forearm.
     The book is written in prose, yet there is a formal circumscription more imminent than anything which would have been possible in poetry. I limited myself by making a point of dealing thoroughly with a given subject in a single page. It was an acute agony, similar to that of Asana, to write, and the effort removed me so far from normal human consciousness that there was something indicibly ghastly in its unnaturalness when I got into bed in full daylight in the hope of acquiring a particle of warmth from the complacent Camel.
     — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Pages 831-832.

 
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