100th

MP

 

THE 100th MONKEY PRESS
Ex Scientia Adhevo Sapientia

Home

Contact Us

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

Book Store

 

Bibliographies

» Aleister Crowley
» Victor B. Neuburg
» Frater Achad

 

Download Texts

» Aleister Crowley
» Victor B. Neuburg
» Frater Achad

 

The 100th Monkey

 

What's New

 

 

 

A NEW PARSIFAL, WILHELM II:
THE VISION OF AN ENGLISH POET


 

»» DOWNLOAD TEXT ««

 

Image
Thumbnails

Title:

A New Parsifal, Wilhelm II:  The Vision of an English Poet

   

Newspaper

 

Article

Type of Media: Periodical.  
Name: The Continental Times.  
Issue: Volume 22, Number 22.     
Date: 20 August 1915.  
Publisher:       
Published At: Berlin, Germany.  
Pages:

   

 
Price:

5 cents. 

 
Remarks:

A version of this text was originally published in the August 1915 issue of The Open Court

 

Author’s
Working
Versions:

 

 

 

 

 

Other
Known
Editions:

+ The New Parsifal; The Open Court; Chicago: Volume XXIX (No. 8); August 1915.
    
 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     But the German propaganda was being done as well as the British propaganda ill. With a little moral ascendancy over Viereck, I could spoil his game completely by doing as much mischief to Germany as the Patriot Bottomley and the other hoarse-throated fishwives of Fleet Street were doing to England. I met with more success than I had hoped.

     Münsterberg was not Argus. I think moreover that folly is contagious. He could hardly keep his young men in hand, especially when apparent victory turned their heads. I found some of them incredibly silly. I had always know Paul Carus for an ass since he published The Gospel of Buddah, but I had no idea that he was such an ass! In The Open Court he published a fancy portrait from my pen of Bloody Bill as Parsifal! Poor old earnest Christian Endeavour Wilhelm, with his megalomania and his theatricalism and his fat-witted Lutheran Gott and his withered hand and his moving-picture-star galaxy of uniforms as the up-to-date Messiah! What a model for "King Arthur come again", to give the heathen Schrecklichkeit!

     I must have been beautifully drunk to write that. I don't remember anything about itbut I must have been much more than drunk when I sent it to Paul Carus. I suppose I had become acclimatized to the idea that all serious and eminent people are perfectly brainless. He swallowed it, hook, line and sinker; and a poor little bookseller in London who had been agent for the paper for years, and had never read a line of it, got three months in prison! The truth is that the British lost all sense of humour when the war broke out. I wonder how many millions in blood and treasure it cost us to "jowk" with such "deeficulty"!

     The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Pages 751-752.

 

 
Reviews:

      

 
       
   

Home

Contact Us

 

 

 

Copyright © the 100th Monkey Press - 2008