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JEZEBEL


 

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Title:

Jezebel and Other Tragic Poems.

   

Upper Cover

 

Lower Cover

 

Turned-In Cover Detail

 

Spine

 

Title Page

 

Dedication

 

Interior Sample

 

Chiswick Press

 

Print
Variations:

State (a):

2 copies printed on vellum.1 

______________________________

 

One copy currently resides in the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas (Call No. PR 6005 R7 J5 1898 - Copy 1).

Rebound and signed by Zaehnsdorf in 1899 in panelled black morocco leather with inside dentelles stamped in gilt.2
Upper and Lower covers stamped with a ruled from in gilt.
7

Spine is stamped in gilt [horizontal rule | ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ‘JEZEBEL’ stamped vertically down the spine within ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ruled frame | raised band with horizontal rule in center | ruled frame ].7
11” x 8 3/4”.
7

______________________________

 

One copy currently resides in the Gerald Yorke collection located in the Warburg Institute Library, University of London.

Rebound by Zaehnsdorf in full blue morocco leather.7

State (b):

10 copies printed on Japanese vellum.1
Bound in Japanese vellum turned-in wrappers.1
Upper cover lettered in gilt within an ornamental frame ‘Jezebel | and other Tragic Poems.’1
11” x 8 3/4”.
7

______________________________

 

One copy currently resides in the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas (Call No. PR 6005 R7 J5 1898 - Copy 2).

State (C):

40 copies printed on hand-made paper.1
Bound in Japanese vellum turned-in wrappers.1
Upper cover lettered in gilt within an ornamental frame ‘Jezebel | and other Tragic Poems.’1
11” x 8 3/4”.
7

 
Publisher: Privately published.1  
Printer: Chiswick Press, Tooks Court, Chancery Lane, London.1  
Published At: London.1  
Date: mid 1898.5  
Edition: 1st Edition.1  
Pages: viii + 23.1  
Price: Unpriced, but copies were originally sold for a half-guinea.1  Copies later sold for 21 shillings through 1904 and sold for 42 shillings thereafter.3  
Remarks: Published under the pseudonym of Count Vladimir Svareff.1
Printed in the Caxton font of antique type.1 
Dedicated to Gerald Kelley.4
Title page printed in black and red.1
 
Pagination:2

 
Page(s)  
[  i] Half-title
[  ii] Blank
[  iii] Title-page
[  iv] Blank
[  v] Dedication
[  vii] Contents
[  viii] Blank
[  1] Introduction, in verse
[  2] Blank
[3 - 7] Text
[  8] Blank
[9 - 12] Text
[13] Divisional title “Other Poems”
[14] Blank
[15] Text
[16] Blank
[17 - 23] Text
[24] Colophon ‘[Crest of the Chiswick Press: argent, a printer’s maul in pale] | Chiswick Press:  Tooks Court | Chancery Lane, London’
 
Contents:

- Dedicace
- Perdita
- Jezebel. Part I.
- Jezebel. Part II.
- Concerning Certain Sins
- A Saint’s Damnation
- Lot
- Epilogue

 

Author’s
Working
Versions:

   

Other
Known
Editions:

+

The Collected Works of Aleister Crowley, Vol. I, pg. 129, Society for the Propagation of Religious Truth, Boleskine, Foyers, Inverness, 1905.

+

Gordon Press, New York, 1974.

+ Selected Poems, Edited by M. Booth, pg. 151, 1986.
 
Bibliographic
Sources:
1.

L. C. R. Duncombe-Jewell, Notes Towards An Outline of A Bibliography of the Writings in Prose and Verse of Aleister Crowley, The Works of Aleister Crowley, Volume III, Appendix A, Gordon Press, New York, 1974, pp. 234-235.  

2.

Dianne Frances Rivers, A Bibliographic List with Special Reference To the Collection at the University of Texas,  Master of Arts Thesis, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 1967, p. 5.     

3. Ibid., p. 6.
4. Richard Kaczynski, Ph.D., Perdurabo:  The Life of Aleister Crowley, North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, California, 2010, p. 61.
5. Ibid., p. 582, note 15.
6.

Timothy d’Arch Smith, Aleister Crowley’s Aceldama (1898):  The A B Copy’, Book Collector, 56, 2 (Summer 2007), p. 220.   

7.

Personal observation of the item.

 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     My poetry at this time is charged to the highest point with these aspirations. I may mention the dedication to Songs of the Spirit, “The Quest”, “The Alchemist”, “The Philosopher’s Progress”, “A Spring Snowstorm in Wastdale”, “Succubus”, “Nightfall”, “The Storm”, “Wheat and Wine”, “Vespers”, “Astrology” and “Daedalus”. In “the Farewell of Paracelsus to Aprile”, “The Initiation”, “Isaiah” and “Power”, I have expressed my ideas about the ordeals which might be expected on the Path. All these poems were published in 1898. In later volumes, Mysteries Lyrical and Dramatic, The Fatal Force, The Temple of the Holy Ghost and Tannhäuser, these ideas are carried further in the light of my practical experience of the Path.
     It may seem strange that, despite the yearning after sanctification, which is the keynote of these works, I never lost sight of what seems on the surface the incompatible idea of justification by sin. “Jezebel” and the other poems in that volume prove this point. It is as if my unconscious were aware that every act is a sacrament and that the most repulsive rituals might be in some ways the most effective. The only adequate way of overcoming evil was to utilize it fully as a means of grace. Religion was for me a passionate reality of the most positive kind. Virtue is etymologically manhood. Virility, creative conception and enthusiastic execution were the means of attainment. There could be no merit in abstention from vice. Vice indeed is vitium, a flaw or defect.
     —
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 146-147.

______________________________
 

     Shortly after I went down, we had a last interview. I had gone down to the Bear at Maidenhead, on the quiet, to write “Jezebel”. I only told one person—in strict confidence—where I was going; but Pollitt found out that person and forced him to tell my secret. He walked into the room shortly after dinner, to my surprise and rage—for when I am writing a poem I would show Azrael himself the door!
     —
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 148-149.

______________________________
 

     There remain my narrative and dramatic books on love. The Tale of Archais is simply jejune; I apologize and pass on. The Mother’s Tragedy, “The Fatal Force”, Jezebel, Tannhäuser, all treat love not as an object in itself, but on the contrary, as a dragon ready to devour any one less than St. George.
     —
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 556-557.

 
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