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SNOWDROPS FROM A CURATE’S GARDEN


 

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Title:

Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden.

   

Upper Cover

 

Lower Cover

 

Interior Cover

 

Cover / Spine

 

Spine

 

Title Page

 

Half Title Page

 

Contents Page

 

Print
Variations
:

100 copies printed on machine-made paper.1
Bound in pale green wrappers.1
Upper Cover lettered ‘SNOWDRORPS | FROM A | CURATE’S GARDEN | 1881 A.D. | COSMOPOLI | [ornament] | IMPRIMÉ SOUS LE MANTEAU | ET NE VEND | NULLE PART’2

Lower cover has a with a vignette design.2 

Spine lettered vertically up the spine ‘SNOWDROPS’.2

7 3/8” x 4 11/16”.2
 
Publisher: Privately published.  
Printer: Philippe Renouard.4  
Published At: Paris.1  The book bears the false imprint of "Cosmopoli" which had been used for other books including Teleny by Oscar Wilde4 and Burton's Kama Sutra, Ananga Ranga, and Perfumed Garden.5  
Date: About 1904.1  The imprint date of "1881" is false.4  
Edition: 1st Edition.  
Pages:

xx + 168.2

 
Price:

 

 

Remarks:

Snowdrops was supposedly written to entertain Crowley's wife at the time, Rose Kelly, as she was convalescing from childbirth.4

A number of copies of this work are said to have been destroyed by H.M. Customs about 1926.3  J. F. C. Fuller gives a destruction date of 1924.7
The cover contains the phrase “Imprime sous le manteau et ne vend nulle part”  which loosely translated from the French means, “Printed under the coat and not available anywhere.”

 
Pagination:2
Page(s)  
[   i] Half-title
[   ii] Blank
[   iii] Title-page
[   iv] Blank
[i-xx] Introduction
[1-6] Prologue
[7-77] Text
[   78] Blank
[   79] Divisional title ‘JUVENILIA’
[   80] Blank
[81-100] Text
[  101] Divisional title ‘THE BROMO BOOK’
[  102] Blank
[103-131] Text
[  132] Blank
[  133] Divisional title ‘MISCELLANEOUS’
[  134] Blank
[135-163] Text
[  164] Blank
[165-167] Contents
[  168] Blank
 
Contents:

- The Nameless Novel
- The Needs of the Navy
- After the Fall
- The Parson’s Prayer
- Long Before Dawn
- Rondel
- ‘To Tite’ fragment
- Stephanos
- A Snatch
- To Pe or not to Pe
- All the World’s a Brothel
- O to be in Clara
- One Way of Love
- Outside the Spanish Cloister

- O How He Loves! 
- Force
- Limericks I-VI
- Advent
- The Sailor Ashore
- Triolets
- Birthday Ode
- Rose Mystica
- T.J.
- Bugger Me Gently, Bertie
- Buggered by a Black Man
- Epigram
- The Automatic Girl
- Girls Together
- Micturating Mary
- The Poet Abroad

 

Author’s
Working
Versions:

1.

Photocopy of typescript.  Pages:  87.  Dated:  1904.  Box 13, Folder 5.  Harry Ransom Center, Austin, TX.

 

Other
Known
Editions:

+

The Teitan Press, Chicago, 1986.

 
Bibliographic
Sources:
1.

Gerald Yorke, A Bibliography of the Works of Aleister Crowley (Expanded and Corrected by Clive Harper from Aleister Crowley, the Golden Dawn and Buddhism:  Reminiscences and Writings of Gerald Yorke, Keith Richmond, editor, The Teitan Press, York Beach, ME, 2011, p. 49.

2. Dianne Frances Rivers, A Bibliographic List with Special Reference To the Collection at the University of Texas,  Master of Arts Thesis, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 1967, pp. 32-33.
3. Aleister Crowley, Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden, The Teitan Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1986, p. iv.
4. Richard Kaczynski, Ph.D., Perdurabo:  The Life of Aleister Crowley, North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, California, 2010, pp. 132-133.
5. Henrik Bogdan & Martin P. Starr, editors, Aleister Crowley and Western Esotericism, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2012, p. 156.
6. J.F.C. Fuller, Bibliotheca Crowleyana:  The Collection of J.F.C. Fuller, Sure Fire Press, Edmonds, WA, 1989, p. 11.
 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     I spent many of my evenings at a little restaurant called the Chat blanc in the rue d’Odessa, where was “an upper room furnished” and consecrated informally to a sort of international clique of writer, painters, sculptors, students and their friends. It has been described with accurate vigour in the introduction to Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden.
     — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 346.

______________________________
 

     I knew that a poet is incapable of recognizing his best work, but I knew also that though good technique does not mean good work bad technique does mean bad work. So I used to experiment with new forms by choosing a ridiculous or obscene subject, lest I should be tempted to publish a poem whose technique showed inexperience.
     Ivor and I, with some assistance from Gerald, collected such of these manuscripts as had not been destroyed, and with “the Nameless Novel”, we composed a volume (Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden.) to carry on the literary form of White Stains and Alice; that is, we invented a perpetrator for the atrocities.
     I do now know what mischievous whim induced me to have the book printed, but I was absolutely innocent of any desire to rival the exploit of Alfred de Musset and George Sand, the Femmes and Hombres of Verlain, or the jeu d’esprit of Mark Twain of which Sir Walter Raleigh is the hero. I did not even hope to get the British government to give me a pension of four thousand pounds a year, as id did to John Cleland.
     — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 346.

 
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