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RODIN


 

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Title:

Rodin

   

 

 
Type of Media: Periodical.  
Name: Les Maîtres Artistes.1  
Issue:    
Date: 15 October 1903.1  
Publisher:      
Published At: Paris, France.  
Pages:

 

 
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Remarks:

Crowleys two sonnets Rodin and Balzac were translated by Marcel Schwob and published in Les Maîtres Artistes.1 

 

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Bibliographic
Sources:
1. Marcel Schwob, Chroniques, Edited by John Alden Green, Librairie Droz S.A., Geneve, 1981, pp. 79-81.  
 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     My sonnet on Rodin begins “Here is a man”, which Marcel Schwob very properly translated, “Un home”.  I took the draft to Rodin’s studio.  One of the men present was highly indignant. “Who is this Marcel Schwob,” He exclaimed, “to pretend to translate from this English?  The veriest schoolboy would know that ‘here is a man’ should be turned into ‘Voici un homme’.”
     This is the sort of thing one meets at every turn. The man was perfectly friendly, well educated and familiar with literature; yet he was capable of such supreme stupidity. The moral is that when an acknowledge master does something that seems at first sight peculiar, the proper attitude is one of reverent eagerness to understand the meaning of his action. This critic made as ass of himself by lack of imagination. He should have know that “Voci un homme” would have sprung instantly into Schwob’s mind as the obviousand adequate rendering. His rejection of it argues deep consideration; and the man might have learnt a valuable lesson by putting himself in Schwob’s place, trying to follow the workings of his mind, and finally discovering the considerations which determine his judgment. I quote this case rather than grosser examples which I recall, because it is so simple and non-controversial, yet involves such important principles. Schwob’s version stands before a background of the history of literature. It would be easy to write a long and interesting essay on the factors of the problem.
     — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Pages 342-343.

 
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