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ART IN AMERICA


 

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Art in America

   

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Advertisement from The Times

 

Type of Media:

Periodical.

 

Name:

The English Review.

 

Issue:

 

 

Date:

November 1913.

 

Publisher:

 

 

Published At:

London.

 

Pages:

Pages 578-595.

 

Price:

1/- net.

 

Remarks:

This is the first appearance in print of this essay. 

 

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Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     In 1912 I took it into my head to write three essays on American art and literature, past, present and future.  I only completed the first, which is published in the English Review.  It aroused a hurricane across the Atlantic and, hard as it is to believe, the echoes have not yet died away.

      The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Page 735.

 

Reviews:

     Aleister Crowley has an article on 'Art in America' which should set all Americans who own to pride of country hot on his trail with loaded revolvers.

The Academy, date unknown.

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     That remarkable young gentleman, Mr. Aleister Crowley, says some hard things about America in The English Review.  He criticizes the art of the country with a pen that must have laid in vitriol since Byron threw it down.  "Longfellow', his pop-gun loaded with pop-corn, and Whittier is little better than Moody and Sankey!  Of the Channings, one need only remark that the uncle was a pedant and the nephew an ignoramus."  "And there was undoubtedly one Cornelius Matthews, who burst his poetic gun the first time he fired it."  In painting, Mr. Crowley declares that Alex Harrison painted two passable pictures by accident.  America has no music, and the only American sculptor that he knows of is a Lithuanian living in Paris.  "The boasted scientific inventions of the Americans do not exist.  What they invent is 'notions,' based on the discovery of others.  Edison is merely an organizer and adaptor of scientific brains."  But had you heard of Aleister Crowley?

The Yorkshire Herald, date unknown.

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      An article which should make him a target, not for individuals, but for an outraged nation.  Mr. Crowley touches our transatlantic neighbors on their weakest spot by proclaiming that their boasted culture is a pose . . . His judgments certainly do not err on the side of leniency . . . One could understand American patriots clamouring for President Wilson to suppress Mr. Crowley as he has tried to suppress Gen. Huerta.

The Northern Whig, date unknown.

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     If America can be ridiculed for its average tourist, it at least furnishes nothing quite so humorous as the type of omniscience here illustrated . . . The article reflects the opinions of a considerable number of Englishmen, especially of the so-called lower middle class.

The New York Evening Post, date unknown.

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     An entirely preposterous, but quite enjoyable, tirade.

The Times, date unknown.

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
       
   

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