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THE SAVIOUR


 

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Title:

The Saviour, A Drama in One Scene

   

Cover

 

Contents

  

Article

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Article (continued)

 

Advertisement from The Fatherland

Type of Media:

Periodical.

 

Name:

The International:  A Review of Two Worlds.

 

Issue:

Volume XII, Number 3.

 

Date:

March 1918.

 

Publisher:

International Monthly, Inc. 

 

Published At:

New York.

 

Pages:

Pages 75-82.

 

Price:

15 Cents.    

 

Remarks:

  

 

Author’s
Working
Versions:

1.

Typescript.  Warburg Institute Collection.

 

Other
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Editions:

 

  

 

 

 

Comments by
Aleister
Crowley:

     I also wrote a one-act play The Saviour. The main idea of this had been in my mind for a long while as a presentation of irony. The council of a city in the extremity of despair invoke a long-expected saviour. He appears to their rapturous relief but turns out to be the enemy they feared in his most frightful form. I elaborated this theme by introducing episodes where they are given a chance to escape. They throw this away for the sake of the saviour. The poignancy is further increased by various vicissitudes. The council is guided by a fool whom they ignore, being the only character with a grain of common sense, and by a prophet whose insane purpose is to deliver the city to destruction. By his inspired advice, the council are lured into one disastrous folly after another, and when the catastrophe occurs the prophet throws off the mask and bloats over the ruin he has wrought.

     This play was accepted by Morris Brown but as bad luck would have it, war conditions obliged him to close his theatre before it could be produced. I published it in The International in March 1918, but only after a struggle with my lawyer, who was seriously alarmed lest Washington should think the cap fitted and suppress the number. The play being written three years earlier, and there being not the slightest allusion to or analogy with current events, his protest showed how dire a reign of terror had been established by the megalomaniac in the White House and his brutal and thick-headed bravo, Burleson.

     — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.  New York, NY.  Hill and Wang, 1969.  Pages 767-768.

 

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